MORTGAGE RIGHTS
Mortgage Loan Servicing Disputes Introduction to Servicing Disputes Your mortgage company (other names for these companies are mortgage servicer and loan servicer) collects your mortgage payment, keeps records of your payments, provides you with account statements, imposes late charges when your payment is late and will pursue you if you become delinquent. If you escrow for property taxes and insurance, your mortgage company also pays property taxes and insurance with your escrow payments. Mortgage companies do not have the financial incentives to provide good service, unlike ordinary businesses. Homeowners, however, cannot switch to a new mortgage company when receiving poor service. You cannot withhold payment if a problem is not corrected because the mortgage company will foreclose on you if you do. You may know about the loan servicers' filing fabricated documents in court or retaining an army of robo-signers to produce the affidavits needed in foreclosures. These practices are evidence that securitization was not done properly. Wall Street's failure to do the securitizations properly was exposed by the avalanche of foreclosures once Wall Street's house of cards collapsed. Servicing disputes, on the other hand, arise out of the every day business of processing payments, keeping records, allocating payments, and paying taxes and insurance. Servicing disputes are not caused by the foreclosure crisis. Servicing disputes are, at the very least, frustrating for homeowners. The danger is that the homeowner can wind up in court fighting a foreclosure. Without the aid of the law, homeowners have few defenses against mortgage companies in the real world. Homeowners cannot hire or fire their servicers. In fact, if homeowners refinance or buy a new home, they could wind up with the same loan servicer. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has enacted regulations governing the practices of loan servicers. The CFPB would be greatly helped in controlling the mortgage companies if you would file complaints when you are mistreated. The CFPB learns from these complaints which mortgage companies are not following the rules. The CFPB is there to protect your financial interests. I urge everyone to support the CFPB by filing complaints. Go to cfpb.gov and follow the instructions. I am going to describe some of the mortgage companies' predatory practices. I will also explain how homeowners and their lawyers can use RESPA (the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act) to bring servicers to heel.
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 MORTGAGE RIGHTS
The site does not provide legal advice. Neither Susan LaCava nor her law firm, LaCava Law, S.C., represent you until there is a signed retainer agreement.
Mortgage Loan Servicing Disputes Introduction to Servicing Disputes Your mortgage company (other names for these companies are mortgage servicer and loan servicer) collects your mortgage payment, keeps records of your payments, provides you with account statements, imposes late charges when your payment is late and will pursue you if you become delinquent. If you escrow for property taxes and insurance, your mortgage company also pays property taxes and insurance with your escrow payments. Mortgage companies do not have the financial incentives to provide good service, unlike ordinary businesses. Homeowners, however, cannot switch to a new mortgage company when receiving poor service. You cannot withhold payment if a problem is not corrected because the mortgage company will foreclose on you if you do. You may know about the loan servicers' filing fabricated documents in court or retaining an army of robo-signers to produce the affidavits needed in foreclosures. These practices are evidence that securitization was not done properly. Wall Street's failure to do the securitizations properly was exposed by the avalanche of foreclosures once Wall Street's house of cards collapsed. Servicing disputes, on the other hand, arise out of the every day business of processing payments, keeping records, allocating payments, and paying taxes and insurance. Servicing disputes are not caused by the foreclosure crisis. Servicing disputes are, at the very least, frustrating for homeowners. The danger is that the homeowner can wind up in court fighting a foreclosure. Without the aid of the law, homeowners have few defenses against mortgage companies in the real world. Homeowners cannot hire or fire their servicers. In fact, if homeowners refinance or buy a new home, they could wind up with the same loan servicer. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has enacted regulations governing the practices of loan servicers. The CFPB would be greatly helped in controlling the mortgage companies if you would file complaints when you are mistreated. The CFPB learns from these complaints which mortgage companies are not following the rules. The CFPB is there to protect your financial interests. I urge everyone to support the CFPB by filing complaints. Go to cfpb.gov and follow the instructions. I am going to describe some of the mortgage companies' predatory practices. I will also explain how homeowners and their lawyers can use RESPA (the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act) to bring servicers to heel.
 MORTGAGE RIGHTS
 MORTGAGE RIGHTS
The site does not provide legal advice. Neither Susan LaCava nor her law firm, LaCava Law, S.C., represent you until there is a signed retainer agreement.
Mortgage Loan Servicing Disputes Introduction to Servicing Disputes Your mortgage company (other names for these companies are mortgage servicer and loan servicer) collects your mortgage payment, keeps records of your payments, provides you with account statements, imposes late charges when your payment is late and will pursue you if you become delinquent. If you escrow for property taxes and insurance, your mortgage company also pays property taxes and insurance with your escrow payments. Mortgage companies do not have the financial incentives to provide good service, unlike ordinary businesses. Homeowners, however, cannot switch to a new mortgage company when receiving poor service. You cannot withhold payment if a problem is not corrected because the mortgage company will foreclose on you if you do. You may know about the loan servicers' filing fabricated documents in court or retaining an army of robo-signers to produce the affidavits needed in foreclosures. These practices are evidence that securitization was not done properly. Wall Street's failure to do the securitizations properly was exposed by the avalanche of foreclosures once Wall Street's house of cards collapsed. Servicing disputes, on the other hand, arise out of the every day business of processing payments, keeping records, allocating payments, and paying taxes and insurance. Servicing disputes are not caused by the foreclosure crisis. Servicing disputes are, at the very least, frustrating for homeowners. The danger is that the homeowner can wind up in court fighting a foreclosure. Without the aid of the law, homeowners have few defenses against mortgage companies in the real world. Homeowners cannot hire or fire their servicers. In fact, if homeowners refinance or buy a new home, they could wind up with the same loan servicer. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has enacted regulations governing the practices of loan servicers. The CFPB would be greatly helped in controlling the mortgage companies if you would file complaints when you are mistreated. The CFPB learns from these complaints which mortgage companies are not following the rules. The CFPB is there to protect your financial interests. I urge everyone to support the CFPB by filing complaints. Go to cfpb.gov and follow the instructions. I am going to describe some of the mortgage companies' predatory practices. I will also explain how homeowners and their lawyers can use RESPA (the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act) to bring servicers to heel.
 MORTGAGE RIGHTS
 MORTGAGE RIGHTS
The site does not provide legal advice. Neither Susan LaCava nor her law firm, LaCava Law, S.C., represent you until there is a signed retainer agreement.
Mortgage Loan Servicing Disputes Introduction to Servicing Disputes Your mortgage company (other names for these companies are mortgage servicer and loan servicer) collects your mortgage payment, keeps records of your payments, provides you with account statements, imposes late charges when your payment is late and will pursue you if you become delinquent. If you escrow for property taxes and insurance, your mortgage company also pays property taxes and insurance with your escrow payments. Mortgage companies do not have the financial incentives to provide good service, unlike ordinary businesses. Homeowners, however, cannot switch to a new mortgage company when receiving poor service. You cannot withhold payment if a problem is not corrected because the mortgage company will foreclose on you if you do. You may know about the loan servicers' filing fabricated documents in court or retaining an army of robo-signers to produce the affidavits needed in foreclosures. These practices are evidence that securitization was not done properly. Wall Street's failure to do the securitizations properly was exposed by the avalanche of foreclosures once Wall Street's house of cards collapsed. Servicing disputes, on the other hand, arise out of the every day business of processing payments, keeping records, allocating payments, and paying taxes and insurance. Servicing disputes are not caused by the foreclosure crisis. Servicing disputes are, at the very least, frustrating for homeowners. The danger is that the homeowner can wind up in court fighting a foreclosure. Without the aid of the law, homeowners have few defenses against mortgage companies in the real world. Homeowners cannot hire or fire their servicers. In fact, if homeowners refinance or buy a new home, they could wind up with the same loan servicer. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has enacted regulations governing the practices of loan servicers. The CFPB would be greatly helped in controlling the mortgage companies if you would file complaints when you are mistreated. The CFPB learns from these complaints which mortgage companies are not following the rules. The CFPB is there to protect your financial interests. I urge everyone to support the CFPB by filing complaints. Go to cfpb.gov and follow the instructions. I am going to describe some of the mortgage companies' predatory practices. I will also explain how homeowners and their lawyers can use RESPA (the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act) to bring servicers to heel.
 MORTGAGE RIGHTS
The site does not provide legal advice. Neither Susan LaCava nor her law firm, LaCava Law, S.C., represent you until there is a signed retainer agreement.  MORTGAGE RIGHTS