MORTGAGE RIGHTS
Introduction to Litigation The Courts One of the causes of misery in the first year of law school (every year is miserable, believe me), is that you are studying how the judicial system works without any basic knowledge of the judicial system. When you "state a case," you have to include the procedural history. You may need to know, for example, that the case was decided on summary judgment, but you have no clue what a summary judgment is. It is like throwing the average American into a championship game of cricket and telling them to just go play. There is no way I can discuss the judicial system in depth on this website. I can, however, introduce you to some basic parts. Trial Court Cases are filed in a trial court, which supervises the pretrial procedures, such as discovery and motions for summary judgment. Trial courts enter judgment on the case, which is, to put it simply, whether the plaintiff (the party that filed the case) wins or loses. If the defendant has included counterclaims in their answer, the court will enter judgment on those claims too. Trial courts enter judgments either after a trial or without a trial on summary judgment or by dismissal. Each state has its own judicial system as well as federal courts. There is a large body of law over whether cases should be heard in state court or federal court and conventional wisdom about which is better in your state. Residential foreclosures are usually filed in state courts. Court of Appeals A court of appeals reviews the work of the trial court to see if any mistakes were made. If a mistake was made, the court of appeals determines whether the mistake caused the trial court to reach a wrong judgment. If the judgment was wrong, the court of appeals sends the case back to the trial court (lawyers say that the case was remanded), which is instructed to correct its mistake and rehear the case. If the court of appeals affirms the trial court, the party losing the appeal either must call it quits or try to appeal to the supreme court. Supreme Court A Supreme Court reviews the work of the court of appeals and the trial court. Unlike a court of appeals, Supreme Courts do not have to hear every case that is appealed to it. The first stage of a supreme court appeal is to submit a brief to the court explaining why it should hear the case. If the Supreme Court agrees to hear the case, both sides submit briefs. The Wisconsin Supreme Court is much more likely to schedule an oral argument than the Wisconsin Court of Appeals.
NEXT: The Complaint and the Response
 MORTGAGE RIGHTS
The site does not provide legal advice. Neither Susan LaCava nor her law firm, LaCava Law, S.C., represent you until there is a signed retainer agreement.
One of the causes of misery in the first year of law school (every year is miserable, believe me), is that you are studying how the judicial system works without any basic knowledge of the judicial system. When you "state a case," you have to include the procedural history. You may need to know, for example, that the case was decided on summary judgment, but you have no clue what a summary judgment is. It is like throwing the average American into a championship game of cricket and telling them to just go play. There is no way I can discuss the judicial system in depth on this website. I can, however, introduce you to some basic parts. Trial Court Cases are filed in a trial court, which supervises the pretrial procedures, such as discovery and motions for summary judgment. Trial courts enter judgment on the case, which is, to put it simply, whether the plaintiff (the party that filed the case) wins or loses. If the defendant has included counterclaims in their answer, the court will enter judgment on those claims too. Trial courts enter judgments either after a trial or without a trial on summary judgment or by dismissal. Each state has its own judicial system as well as federal courts. There is a large body of law over whether cases should be heard in state court or federal court and conventional wisdom about which is better in your state. Residential foreclosures are usually filed in state courts. Court of Appeals A court of appeals reviews the work of the trial court to see if any mistakes were made. If a mistake was made, the court of appeals determines whether the mistake caused the trial court to reach a wrong judgment. If the judgment was wrong, the court of appeals sends the case back to the trial court (lawyers say that the case was remanded), which is instructed to correct its mistake and rehear the case. If the court of appeals affirms the trial court, the party losing the appeal either must call it quits or try to appeal to the supreme court. Supreme Court A Supreme Court reviews the work of the court of appeals and the trial court. Unlike a court of appeals, Supreme Courts do not have to hear every case that is appealed to it. The first stage of a supreme court appeal is to submit a brief to the court explaining why it should hear the case. If the Supreme Court agrees to hear the case, both sides submit briefs. The Wisconsin Supreme Court is much more likely to schedule an oral argument than the Wisconsin Court of Appeals.  MORTGAGE RIGHTS
Introduction to Litigation The Courts
 MORTGAGE RIGHTS
The site does not provide legal advice. Neither Susan LaCava nor her law firm, LaCava Law, S.C., represent you until there is a signed retainer agreement.
One of the causes of misery in the first year of law school (every year is miserable, believe me), is that you are studying how the judicial system works without any basic knowledge of the judicial system. When you "state a case," you have to include the procedural history. You may need to know, for example, that the case was decided on summary judgment, but you have no clue what a summary judgment is. It is like throwing the average American into a championship game of cricket and telling them to just go play. There is no way I can discuss the judicial system in depth on this website. I can, however, introduce you to some basic parts. Trial Court Cases are filed in a trial court, which supervises the pretrial procedures, such as discovery and motions for summary judgment. Trial courts enter judgment on the case, which is, to put it simply, whether the plaintiff (the party that filed the case) wins or loses. If the defendant has included counterclaims in their answer, the court will enter judgment on those claims too. Trial courts enter judgments either after a trial or without a trial on summary judgment or by dismissal. Each state has its own judicial system as well as federal courts. There is a large body of law over whether cases should be heard in state court or federal court and conventional wisdom about which is better in your state. Residential foreclosures are usually filed in state courts. Court of Appeals A court of appeals reviews the work of the trial court to see if any mistakes were made. If a mistake was made, the court of appeals determines whether the mistake caused the trial court to reach a wrong judgment. If the judgment was wrong, the court of appeals sends the case back to the trial court (lawyers say that the case was remanded), which is instructed to correct its mistake and rehear the case. If the court of appeals affirms the trial court, the party losing the appeal either must call it quits or try to appeal to the supreme court. Supreme Court A Supreme Court reviews the work of the court of appeals and the trial court. Unlike a court of appeals, Supreme Courts do not have to hear every case that is appealed to it. The first stage of a supreme court appeal is to submit a brief to the court explaining why it should hear the case. If the Supreme Court agrees to hear the case, both sides submit briefs. The Wisconsin Supreme Court is much more likely to schedule an oral argument than the Wisconsin Court of Appeals.  MORTGAGE RIGHTS
Introduction to Litigation The Courts
 MORTGAGE RIGHTS
The site does not provide legal advice. Neither Susan LaCava nor her law firm, LaCava Law, S.C., represent you until there is a signed retainer agreement.
One of the causes of misery in the first year of law school (every year is miserable, believe me), is that you are studying how the judicial system works without any basic knowledge of the judicial system. When you "state a case," you have to include the procedural history. You may need to know, for example, that the case was decided on summary judgment, but you have no clue what a summary judgment is. It is like throwing the average American into a championship game of cricket and telling them to just go play. There is no way I can discuss the judicial system in depth on this website. I can, however, introduce you to some basic parts. Trial Court Cases are filed in a trial court, which supervises the pretrial procedures, such as discovery and motions for summary judgment. Trial courts enter judgment on the case, which is, to put it simply, whether the plaintiff (the party that filed the case) wins or loses. If the defendant has included counterclaims in their answer, the court will enter judgment on those claims too. Trial courts enter judgments either after a trial or without a trial on summary judgment or by dismissal. Each state has its own judicial system as well as federal courts. There is a large body of law over whether cases should be heard in state court or federal court and conventional wisdom about which is better in your state. Residential foreclosures are usually filed in state courts. Court of Appeals A court of appeals reviews the work of the trial court to see if any mistakes were made. If a mistake was made, the court of appeals determines whether the mistake caused the trial court to reach a wrong judgment. If the judgment was wrong, the court of appeals sends the case back to the trial court (lawyers say that the case was remanded), which is instructed to correct its mistake and rehear the case. If the court of appeals affirms the trial court, the party losing the appeal either must call it quits or try to appeal to the supreme court. Supreme Court A Supreme Court reviews the work of the court of appeals and the trial court. Unlike a court of appeals, Supreme Courts do not have to hear every case that is appealed to it. The first stage of a supreme court appeal is to submit a brief to the court explaining why it should hear the case. If the Supreme Court agrees to hear the case, both sides submit briefs. The Wisconsin Supreme Court is much more likely to schedule an oral argument than the Wisconsin Court of Appeals.  MORTGAGE RIGHTS
Introduction to Litigation The Courts
The site does not provide legal advice. Neither Susan LaCava nor her law firm, LaCava Law, S.C., represent you until there is a signed retainer agreement.  MORTGAGE RIGHTS